Making the invisible, visible. Visualisation considers making invisible systems into visible depictions. For example, how wi-fi systems work, or someone’s thought process when buying something etc can all be described as ‘visualisations.’

 

What is the relation between information, forms of content/expression and the social?  We must consider how publics interpret information when it is given. How do these visualisations allow us to see information in a different light? Referred to as visual expression, these can also shape publics and how each public interprets information.

 

Such a visualisation allows us to assemble new ways of distributing information and as an extension, providing more ways for different publics that are unknown to be formed.

An example of a visualisation can be seen below;

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 (reference; http://infosthetics.com/archives/2007/01/how_does_200_calories_look_like.html)

This visualisation above represents what 200 calories ‘actually’ is. I thought that this visualisation was very representative of society today. We live in a very health-aware 21st century. Our televisions are constantly bombarded with lifestyle shows such as Masterchef and The Biggest Loser making us more health conscious.  The diagrams represented include a clear juxtaposition between the small amount of junk food that needs to be consumed to fill the 200 calorie quota as opposed to large quantities of healthy foods. This visualisation has converted this invisible data to a visible visualisation, an embodied experience from reading to interaction, thus relating back to social life. Individuals form a greater awareness by looking at the physical depiction of the issue.

 

 

 

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(reference; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Plain_cigarette_packaging.jpg)

I also consider cigarette packets a sort of ‘visualisation.’ Introduced in October of 2012, cigarette packets sold in Australia are to have standard ‘plain’ packaging which consists of white packets with black text and no colours or logos. On these packets include graphic depictions of the effects smoking has on the long run, such as emphysema.   I consider this to be a form of a visualisation as people are aware of the of the negative aspects of smoking however it has never really been put directly in front of them. This considers how visualisations reflect on society therefore influencing the individual. It is a societal function that smoking is detrimental to health. This ‘invisible’ thought has been visualised onto these packets thus influencing the individual directly whether or not they decide to smoke. 

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